Chef Dale Talde

by Mari on August 20, 2014

Dale Talde’s love of being around food and food culture developed thanks to his large Filipino family, who frequently had dinner parties and gatherings where everyone would bring a dish to share. Today, he is the executive chef of Talde and Pork Slope in Brooklyn, and a two-time contestant on Bravo’s Emmy Award-winning culinary show, “Top Chef.”

Do you have a mentor or chef who particularly inspired you?
When I was in Chicago, I worked with Carrie Nahabedian at her restaurant called Naha. When I first worked with her, I was maybe three years out of culinary school. I was cooking, but I didn’t know what I was doing. When I met her, it kind of clicked. You walked into her restaurant, it was a family owned business and she treated everyone like they were family, which was good and bad. You fight harder when someone is like your brother or sister, and when you messed up in front of her, you felt like you messed up in front of your mom. There really was a sense of community in the restaurant. Her philosophy on being local and seasonal, trying to find the best source, and supporting local farmers really made an impact on me. I’d never really seen that much dedication before, and she really brought that to my attention.

What is the most important aspect of cooking?
Tasting everything. You’re producing something that is going to be eaten. If you don’t taste it, how do you know if it is good? We’re not building TVs, not saving the world, we’re not curing cancer… we are making food that has to be consumed. As a part of that process, before someone else tastes it, you have to taste it to make sure it’s good.

What do you think of the importance of having cooking experience in foreign countries?
As a chef, you have to travel. It is almost a part of your job to travel. You have to learn about other cultures, because you’re not just learning about food, you are learning about culture. And to learn about culture, you have to immerse yourself into it. Whether you are cooking American or Japanese food, traveling is a big part of what you need to do to grow, learn, and be better.

What do your knives mean to you?
That’s a very personal question. To me my knives are a culinary journey. It’s the beginning. Every knife has a story and my knives are the story of my career. Even as a Sous Chef in Chicago, I always felt like I was just a cook. Then I came to New York, and I thought “hey you’re in the toughest and best place for restaurants. You’re playing with the big boys now, so you have to be the best.”

What do you think of the recent popularity of Japanese food and knives?
I love it! It was inevitable. The range of food in Japan doesn’t end at sushi and sashimi, and it’s awesome street food. What I love about Japan is that like America, they also embrace other cultures through their cuisine, then reinvent it to make it their own, and they do it well.

In regards to Japanese knives… Well, if you want the best, then you get them. If you want the best car you go to Italy and get a Ferrari, or whatever you will. If you want the best, then you just have to go there. In my opinion, Japanese knives blow away anything else I’ve put in my hand to use as a tool. We work such long hours in this profession, and I’m going to have the most comfortable shoes, clothes, and knives: to me it’s only Nenox.

What is your goal in your profession?
My goal personally is to keep growing. We love opening restaurant concepts, and one of them may or may not be Japanese. A part of what we like to do is to keep it fresh and keep on changing. We have everything from a bar that serves great burgers to a tavern that has great fried chicken, and then we have Talde.

What is your advice for aspiring chefs?
Put your head down and work. Just work. This industry is built on how much effort you put into it and that’s it. The harder you work, the more successful you will become. There are no shortcuts to what we do in this industry.

What is your philosophy towards hospitality?
Understand what the word “hospitality” means. There are a lot of chefs, general managers, and restaurateurs that do not fully understand what the word means. Our business is build on the word “hospitality.” It is about taking care of somebody, being hospitable, and being nice. This is not an easy industry, but a lot of people lose track of the fact that you have to be nice to everybody! A lot of chefs, including myself, had to learn how to be nice to everybody, and not just your guests or customers. Your purveyors, supplies, garbage collectors… You have to nice to everybody, because that’s what we do. That is my philosophy on hospitality, trying to really understand what that word means.

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Spoil Your Knife! Featuring the SHARPENING STONE BASE (Item #HA-1037) Raises the stone slightly off your work surface, so you have a better, easier angle to work with.

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Claire likes the Suisin Inox Menkiri

by Wendy on August 15, 2014

Friday Staff Pick Day – Claire likes the Suisin Inox Menkiri. “The Suisin Menkiri is a stain-resistant knife, which makes it easier to care for than carbon knives. It’s very unique looking and made for a specific task — cutting noodles. Every time I see it, I always think it looks like something out of a dystopian sci-fi movie. I love sci-fi and I love noodles!”

MAKE IT YOURS:
http://korin.com/Suisin-Inox-Menkiri

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Spoil Your Knife! Featuring the DIAMOND SHARPENING STONE #300/#300

August 14, 2014

Spoil Your Knife! Featuring the DIAMOND SHARPENING STONE #300/#300 (Item #HA-1092) Not for the novice knife sharpener, this double-sided diamond sharpening stone makes quick, efficient work of knife sharpening with its incredibly abrasive, hard surface. A great tool for quickly creating a new sharp edge on your knife, use this stone with a few soft [...]

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Thanks for stopping by Chef Viet Pham

August 13, 2014

Thanks for stopping by Chef Viet Pham

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Chef Jet Tila

August 13, 2014

Jet Tila was born into a restaurant family, with his parents opening some of the first Thai restaurants in Los Angeles. In his twenties, Tila attended Le Cordon Bleu to build a foundation of French technique to complement his background in Asian cooking. The combination has proved explosive – Tila has become a much desired [...]

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Mark your calendar! Chef’s Night at Korin!

August 8, 2014

This was last year’s Chef’s Night at Korin … We hope you can come join us this year at our biggest event, CHEF’S NIGHT AT KORIN PARTY on September 15th. Mark your calendar & RSVP at facebook.com/korinknives/events  

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SHARPENING STONE FIXER

August 7, 2014

SHARPENING STONE FIXER (Item #HA-1075) Use a stone fixer to flatten a concave water stone before sharpening. MAKE IT YOURS: http://korin.com/Pink-Sharpening-Stone-Fixer

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Chef Chika Tillman

August 6, 2014

  Chika Tillman was born in Tokyo and trained at the French Culinary Institute. She has assisted as opening staff at Gramercy Tavern, Danny Meyer, the Ritz-Carlton, and Seeger’s. In 2003 she opened ChikaLicious Dessert Bar with her husband, Don Tillman. Her delicate Japanese sensibilities and emphasis on the purity of ingredients quickly won her [...]

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KITAYAMA FINE GRAIN SHARPENING STONE – #8000

August 5, 2014

KITAYAMA FINE GRAIN SHARPENING STONE – #8000 (Item #HA-1057) The #8,000 grit stone is the best finishing stone for the sharpest and most polished blade. We recommend this stone for those working with mostly produce and non-fatty ingredients. MAKE IT YOURS: http://korin.com/Kitayama-Fine-Stone-8000

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